FATE Crusade

Using FATE Crusade

FATE Crusade as mentioned is similar but very different from FATE Core. In Crusade, players have a set of skills and attribute that, combined with Traits and Stunts define who a character is. A Knight might be a skilled Swordsman who is Strong (Brawn), is a very Skilled Fighter (Stunt - Skilled: Blades), but suffers from Alcoholism (Trait). That same Swordsman could forgo strength but fight with reflexes (Grace), or similarly he could use his mind as a weapon. Knowing when to strike by laying traps and combat maneuvers to lure an opponent into an opening. (Brilliance or Alacrity). In FATE Crusade the only limitation is YOUR ability to tell a story with a GM or Staff.

During play characters can earn a maximum of three skills at 3, one skill at 4 and one skill at 5

Attributes cannot be changed during play.

All the tabs below are repeated here for reference. The ones on the chargen page are the most up to date and accurate.

In FATE Crusade, players roll a Skill to accomplish goals, but can spend a FATE point to add their attribute to a skill to give them an even larger edge.

Please see tabs and/or chargen page for better information on Stunts and Traits.

  • Players have 3 FATE Points.
  • Physical Stress can be considered one's Hit Points. A player has Physical Stress equal to their Brawn + Grace.
  • Mental Stress is one's moral and mental hit points. A player has Mental Stress equal to their Brilliance + Alacrity.
  • Armor: This is one's hit points in combat. This is calculated by One's Physical Stress + Armor Value.

The stunt pre-requisites are:

  • Sorcery (Required to cast magic. Sorcery also requires the sorcery and forbidden lore skills.)
  • Alchemist (Required to use alchemy)
  • Weapon Master (To get a 5 in weapon skill)
  • Skilled (To get a 5 in a particular non combat skill)
  • Warlord to gain Command 5

FATE Crusade Combat

Armor

Armor add to your Physical Stress in combat. The better the Armor, the more you have! Other than armoured corsets, most armours are implied to include at least helmets with them (unless noted ICly). However, they don't all cover the same areas of one's body. A hauberk or breastplate generally covers the torso and shoulders, while a suit of mail, scale, brigandine, heavy lorrica or full plate covers most if not all of the body.

Of note, breastplates, while having the same armour rating Lorrica cuirasses and Coat of Plates, are much more durable under concerted pressure. Blows that might smash or bend lorica segments or break portions of the coat of plates would likely only dent the breastplate. On the other hand, they do tend to cost considerably more.

For PCs, as long as you declare your armour we will generally honour it. For example, if you have a mail hauberk with greaves on and have declared this, you'll gain equivalent protection on your legs.

The areas of coverage are important during combat, as injuries can occur to non-covered areas more frequently and more grievously than those with armour on them. Armour can be very expensive, however, especially in the highest levels.

Armored Corset 1
Padded Jack / Gambeson 1
Boiled Leather 1
Mail Hauberk 2
Scale Shirt 2
Full Mail 2
Full Scale 2
Lorrica 3
Coat of Plates (Brigandine Vest) 3
Breastplate 3
Brigandine (Suit) 3
Heavy Lorrica 3
Full Plate 4

Shields add +1 (See special use in FATE Points)

Weapons
Weapons are anything you can use to inflict harm on another poor sap. From a flintlock pistol all the way to a chair leg, weapons hurt. For the most part weapons do not add anything to your combat stats or damage. However below are listed the rare exceptions.

Two Handed Weapons: +1 Damage. Cannot use a shield.
Sidhe Steel: +1 Damage
Lightsilver: +1 Damage to Supernatural Creatures ONLY.

FATE Points
Characters may use FATE Points in the following ways:

  • Characters may spend a FATE point to add their Attribute to a skill roll. In cases where a player is making an attribute roll, this adds the attribute twice.
  • Invoke a Stunt
  • Refuse a Compel
  • Declare a Story Detail
  • Deflect all Damage done this round of combat. This can only be done if wielding a shield. IF you do this, roll on the following chart by typing +die 1d4+0

1 - All Damage absorbed, no negative effects
2 - Damage Absorbed, but you miss the following attack
3 - All Damage absorbed, no negative effects
4 - All Damage absorbed but the shield is DESTROYED.

Stressing Out

The Following are the damage rules for both Mental and Physical Stress. There is a misconception that Stress is hit points. The truth is, there just are not hit points in FATE Crusade. There is only story. That is while you are at positive physical stress, you suffer near misses or nicks. Think of it like a movie. The hero during the fight gets stabbed. But lo and behold he still fights like there's nothing wrong. This is Physical Stress.

At any time, a player may ignore all damage dealt to them at the cost of a permanent injury. These permanent injuries are decided by Staff.

Now. Let's say you go BELOW Zero. For Every point of Stress you take below zero you take a Temporary Wound. This can be assigned by the GM, or if the GM is busy (As we often are!) Feel free to give yourself one that makes sense to the weapon you were hit by. Remember FATE Crusade is a COOPERATIVE story system.

Now. An individual Character can only take as much negative Physical Stress as they have in Grace and Brawn. So a Character with Grace 2 and Brawn 2, can take 4 Temporary Traits. The moment they hit that threshold they fall over and must make the following roll:

+froll/challenge 4df+(Physical Stress)v2

If a player fails that roll then they die. Even if they succeed at this role, the player is still unconscious. Now the player does have options to remain alive. They can take a PERMANENT TRAIT that is a PERMANENT WOUND. This means the player can take grievous injuries and still keep fighting. Just like a real Hero.

Now. On to Mental Stress. Mental stress represents how much trauma a character can sustain before mental issues start to take hold. These can take many forms from simply turning and running away in fear, to full-on mental breakdowns. There are many things, both mundane and supernatural that can affect a player's mental stress, the most common being Mass Combat.

In Mass Combat, when a player's Mental Stress reaches 0, they flee combat. A Commander can rally them, but once they reach their Negative Value in mental Stress they flee and nothing can rally them. In Mass Combat a player does NOT earn Temporary Mental Stress.

Like Physical Stress when a player takes Mental Stress below 0 they take a Temporary Mental Trait. A Player can only earn a Temporary Trait for each point of Mental Stress they have. If they reach their Mental Stress threshold they simply flee, or even fall in place and scream, or even find a corner to rock themselves in.

It is important to note that Temporary Mental Stress DOES NOT NEED TO BE ROLEPLAYED UNLESS COMPELLED. However unlike normal compels, ANYBODY can in a scene can compel the player to RP their temporary Mental Trait. Like all compels, a player may spend a FATE Point to ignore the compel. However, only when compelled by Staff or the person running the scene can a player EARN a FATE Point.

De-Stressing

So. Your haracter got their butt kicked and how has taken a ton of stress and has gained some Physical Stress as well as Mental Stress. No worries. It happens to the best of us. How long does it last though? Well now. THAT is an interesting question.

Physical Stress and Mental Stress that did NOT go below 0 goes away at the end of the scene. This means if you have 6 Physical Stress and took only 4 of it Stress from combat, by the next scene you are at your full 6 Physical Stress. Does this mean you were untouched? No. Remember this Stress represents scrapes and stabs that don't slow you down. So after a particularly brutal combat a character may need to see a medic to get that looked at. Basically, they need a Band-Aid and for Mama to kiss it make it better.

Physical Stress dipped below zero and earns Temporary Wounds, that is another matter. Typically with Physical Stress, a Temporary wound lasts 4 days +1 for each level of Temporary wounds. A character can remember when they will be done with it by simply putting the date next to the trait that it will be gone. Here is an example from our friend Jarl Bob.

Jarl Bob has a Physical Stress of 5. He took 3 Physical Stress Below Zero, meaning he was at -3 and suffers three temporary wounds. Here they are along with how many days it will take to be healed.

  • Deep Arm Cut - 4 days
  • Concussion - 5 days
  • Cracked Rib - 6 days

Now. Some of you may state that 6 days isn't enough time to HEAL a broken bone. That's fine, it might not be healed! But for game purposes, Jarl Bob is heroic enough to ignore it and get back to the fine job of kicking ass and taking names. Because he's Jarl Bob damnit.

Outside healing via Alchemy is tricky, Here is a rule of thumb of Alchemical Healing.

  • Simple Healing Draught: Takes away the pain, and reduces Healing time by 2 Days
  • Flesh Knit: Reduces Heal Time by 3 days for ALL Temporary Wounds
  • Vitae - Removes Temporary wounds, AND if applied RIGHT AFTER the player would gain a Permanent Wound, will negate the Permanent wound BUT leave the Temporary wounds as well as move the Permanent to Temporary. This will not, however, regrow lost limbs or eyes, but will at the least, seal the wound from infection.

Mental Stress is another matter entirely. Temporary Mental Stress is a temporary mental illness. These don't just go away and there is not potion to cure them. IF one finds themselves earning Temporary Mental Stress then they are stuck with it for however long the GM says. This can be a set amount of days, until the end of a story arc, or even up to a year (Gulp)!

Permanent Mental Stress earned likely by speaking to some Cthonic horror due to wrong place wrong time or your own stupidity is there to stay. You CAN have them removed by careful treatment and such, but you will need a huge story to have them removed. Or have God himself touch your forehead and remove it. Those are really your only options.

Unless told otherwise, FATE rolls 4 dice. In FATE Crusade, a player rolls four dice + skill or attribute.

+froll/basic is a straight roll of a skill or attribute.

To do this you type the following:

+froll/basic AdF+B: roll A FATE dice plus a constant B.
EX: +froll/basic 4df+3

+froll/challenge is a skill roll against a target difficulty set by the GM for the scene. This can be anything from 0-8. 0 meaning you just have to get in the positives for your roll.

+froll/challenge AdF+BvC: roll A FATE dice plus a constant B versus a target number of C.
EX: +froll/challenge 4df+3v2

+froll/vs is against an opponent. This could be an NPC or another player. If an NPC the GM will tell you what the modifier is. To do this you type the following:

+froll/vs AdF+BvCdF+D against Opponent's Name: roll A FATE dice plus a constant B versus opponent's C FATE dice plus their constant D to see who gets the better result.
EX: 4df+3v4df+3 against Bob

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