Culture

The Culture of the West is little different from one Kingdom to another. They all, thanks to the influence of the one faith or another share common societal ideals and holidays. The influence of a common ancestry with the Vir Sidus Empire has helped cement these ideas, as well as days that are important to the various faiths and Kingdoms of the West.

  • The Grid is roughly the size of Western Europe.
  • Time on the Eternal Crusade moves on a 1:1 basis. However we are firm believers in players being able to be at TP scenes, so we have what is called "Dramatic Time." Which loosely means that if there is a scene, and you were in a scene in another country just yesterday, then we'll allow that player to be at the scene. However, Dramatic Time cannot be used to gain an advantage over other players or for your own characters without consent. Nor can Dramatic Time be used to avoid IC consequences for IC decisions Dramatic Time is purely an OOC tool to help get your characters to where RP is happening. If there would be negative IC consequences for your character being in that place where the RP is happening, Dramatic Time does not mitigate or eliminate those consequences in any way whatsoever.

For example: You cannot use dramatic time to steal a march on an enemy force unless approved directly by staff. You cannot use Dramatic Time to magically be back at your post when you ICly abandoned it right before an attack, or to teleport back to the side of someone you were supposed to protect in Fortress Duval when you decided to hop over to Four Corners for a tryst with a Courtesan the night before. IC decisions still have IC consequences, dramatic time or no.

Dancing

In the West (And really everywhere else) there is occasional Balls. During these social events, there is a fair number of eating, drinking, plotting and of course Dancing. Here is the list of what can be found by country, with of course dances from other countries occurring in neighboring lands quite frequently. Just to spice things up.

These Dances are found all over the West and beyond and are the common dances. It is important to note that unlike in the Real World, the Lead position of the Dance is determined by Social Standing. IE if a Duke is Dancing with a Viscount, the Duke leads. If they share the same social standing, then the elder takes the lead.

The Romance: The Romance is a slow dance where the couple is close together, though not so close that their whole bodies are touching. They are roughly at elbow length and hold hands. The lead directs the flow, and the music is usually soft, slow and often makes many Romantics swoon. Hence, the name of the dance.

Fencing: Similar to The Romance but faster. Instead of holding hands, the couple crosses their dominant forearm. A favored of the young, the tempo is quick and the feet move quickly. Usually, the woman has to use one hand to hold up an edge of her skirt so that she or her partner do not trip on the thing.

Genders and Sexuality

Gender roles in the Civilized West are considerably more equal than most of real-world medieval history. Both Men and Women fought alongside each other in the ancient battles against the Old Things, and as such, there is in most cases no social stigma attached to female warriors in the present day. In most places and families, females are capable of inheriting lands and title from their parents and often serve as the heads of their houses. It's not uncommon for a male to take his wife's surname, if his wife is of a more prestigious house and he isn't the heir or head of his own. In the Civilized West, so long as you're capable of achieving the path you set for yourself, few are going to argue your right to follow it just because you do or don't have teats. Certainly, chauvinism still exists, and there are some families and regions where more strictly defined "traditional" roles for men and women are encouraged or emphasized, but on the whole women can do anything men can do, provided they prove themselves physically and mentally suited to it.

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